13 O’Clock Episode 65 – Poltergeists Who Play With Fire: Canneto di Caronia and More!

A poltergeist infestation can be a pain in the ass at the best of times, but what happens when the manifestations cause actual, massive property damage? That’s allegedly what happened in these six tales of fire-starting poltergeists. Tom and Jenny discuss the mysterious town-wide outbreak of fires in Canneto di Caronia, Italy (and how they may have a rational explanation after all), as well as five more infamous cases of “fire spooks” that occurred at Caledonia Mills, Nova Scotia; Odon, Indiana; Macomb, Illinois; Bladenboro, North Carolina; and Orland Hills, Illinois. Were these fires caused by some supernatural entity, by some kid with latent pyrokinetic powers, or by someone with a box full of matches and a penchant for destructive pranks? Have your graham crackers and marshmallows at the ready as we heat up for episode 65.

Download the audio version here or watch the YouTube video here.

Please support us on Patreon! Don’t forget to follow the 13 O’Clock Podcast blog, subscribe to our YouTube channel, like us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter.

Song at the end: “Fire of Unknown Origin” by Blue Oyster Cult.

13 O’Clock Episode 63 – Spooktacular Halloween Special!

It’s the best day of the year: HALLOWEEN!!! In honor of this most epic of holidays, Tom and Jenny are devoting most of this super-sized show to creepy-ass stories sent in by our weird and wonderful listeners. Check out some spooky true shit and also enjoy our musings on our Spooky Empire experience, the totality of the KrussellSphere, Ed Warren fighting a werewolf, and lots of other fun Halloweeny topics.

Download the audio version here or watch the YouTube video here.

Please support us on Patreon! Don’t forget to follow the 13 O’Clock Podcast blog, subscribe to our YouTube channel, like us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter.

Song at the beginning: “Halloween” by the Misfits. Song at the end: “Horror Music Mashup Remix – Halloween Special” by rezo. Video clips courtesy of Videvo, Anomalous Curiosities, Breaking Barriers, Beachfront, Eggert Gunnarsson, Ghostly Apparitions, Andrew Nicholson, Christopher Robins, mrbush1980, and Cecilia Cristina. Sound effects and music clips courtesy of freesound.org users YourZombieCrush, NaturesTemper, cognito perceptu, InspectorJ, BatMetal, and eclipseprophet.

13 O’Clock Episode 52 – EVP and Spirit Communication

Have you ever been making a recording in a creepy old house (like you do) and gotten a lot more than you bargained for, such as, say, disembodied voices turning up on your audio devices? Welcome to the eerie and controversial world of electronic voice phenomena (EVP), which has now become an integral part of any paranormal investigation. The internet is awash in spooky recordings of supposed voices of the dead, but how real is this phenomena, and can our video and audio technology really be used to communicate with the other side? On this installment of 13 O’Clock, Tom and Jenny discuss EVPs and spirit communication, play some examples of EVPs, break down the history of the concept of talking to ghosts through audio devices, and hone in on some of the better known figures in the field, such as Marcello Bacci and the radio he uses to talk to spirits. Tune in to our ghostly frequency and listen for the voices, because it’s time for episode 52.

Download the audio podcast here, or watch the YouTube version here. Also, don’t forget to follow the 13 O’Clock Podcast blog, subscribe to our YouTube channel, like us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter. And be sure to check out our list channel, 13 O’Clock In Minutes! AND SUPPORT US ON PATREON!!! For iTunes listeners, here is a link to the new feed.  And here’s a link to me on the See You On The Other Side Podcast. More info and examples of EVP at this website. Song at the end: “The Voices of the Dead” by Funker Vogt.

13 O’Clock Episode 41 – The Dark Side Haunting, From the Files of Ed and Lorraine Warren

In 1978, Bobby and Addie Wilcott bought an old New England house to fix up. Little did they know that a few decades later, enough creepy shit would happen in their humble abode to warrant a pretty damn good episode of A Haunting titled “The Dark Side.” The haunting started small — doors opening and closing by themselves, a broken player piano suddenly belting out tunes willy-nilly — but eventually cockroaches, child endangerment, and the Warrens got involved. On this episode, Tom and Jenny return to their discussion/review of A Haunting episodes, talking about the re-enactment itself, and also taking another opportunity to talk about the Warrens, because you know how we always have fun doing that. Spray around some odor of sanctity and enjoy episode 41.

Download the audio file from Project Entertainment Network here, or watch the YouTube version here. Also, don’t forget to follow the 13 O’Clock Podcast blog, subscribe to our YouTube channel, like us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter.

“House of Fire and Whispers” Now In Audio Book!

I know I’ve been teasing this for a while, but it’s finally here! My newest book with Steve Mera, House of Fire and Whispers, about the infamous “Demons In Seattle” case, is now available in audio book form! Narrated by ME! Purchase it from Audible! And hey, just as before, if you don’t have an account with Audible yet, and you sign up for a free account and buy my book first, then I get a nice little bonus. So, again, it would be great if you did that. But even if you don’t, please buy, listen, enjoy, then please review on Amazon, if you wouldn’t mind. Reviews really do help. 🙂

And don’t forget, The Rochdale Poltergeist is also available in audio book, and I also still have a few free download codes that I can give to anyone who promises to review it on Amazon. Shoot me a message on here or at hecate80@hotmail.com if you want a free review copy, and I will get you taken care of. Thanks for all the support, paranormal pals!

Goddess out.

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Hulu Horror Double Feature: Find Me and Spirit in the Woods

Woo, look at me, doing another one of these things already. It’s Monday as I write this, and I can’t use a hangover as an excuse for my movie-watching sloth like I did on Sunday, but hey, I got all the work done I needed to get done today (two graphic design jobs, two loads of laundry, two mile walk, thorough kitchen clean, thank you very much), and decided to chill with some more Hulu. Don’t judge me, y’all.

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First on today’s agenda is 2014’s Find Me, one of many low-budget haunting flicks that came out following the smash success of The Conjuring. The setup of Find Me should be pretty familiar to any horror fan with two brain cells to rub together: Newlywed couple moves into long-empty house in wife’s rural hometown, scary noises and flashes of a female spirit in a white dress commence, there’s a creepy tinkly music box involved, and eventually a past tragedy concerning the wife comes to light. Lather, rinse, repeat. I don’t mean to be too hard on this movie, because it was actually pretty well done and enjoyable, but it isn’t anything we haven’t seen before.

That said, one place where it really did bring something new to the table was the characters. The two leads were also co-writers of the screenplay, and they did a nice job of making the married couple at the center of the action quite likable and sympathetic. I really appreciated that they subverted the “husband doesn’t believe the wife about the haunting” trope; it was really refreshing to see the couple investigating the mystery together, and even making self-aware jokes about Indian burial grounds and quoting the movie Poltergeist in jest (“You only moved the headstones!!!”). The wife’s friend was also a sarcastic delight, and I was really happy to see the three characters treating the haunting the way most modern people probably would: Freaked out, but curious, and oddly bemused by the whole thing. Additionally, there were some pretty creepy moments and a few good scares, so points there.

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The resolution of the mystery at the center of the haunting, though, probably could have been handled better. For one thing, I found it pretty hard to believe that it took like an hour of the movie’s runtime before the wife figured out who the ghost might be, even though the answer was staring her right in the face. I mean—and this is a SPOILER ALERT, so don’t read the rest of this paragraph if you don’t want to know who the ghost is—if you had a twin sister who was kidnapped and murdered as a child during a game of hide and seek, and there’s a ghost in your house who looks just like you and keeps leaving you messages to “find me,” you don’t have to be a rocket surgeon to grok what’s going on, dig? I thought you could.

Also, as much as I loved the way the movie clearly tried to undermine the typical horror movie clichés, in the final act of the story, it seems like it fell prey to pretty much all of them, all at once. The ending might have been much better if it had been toned down some, since the nice slow burn of the first two-thirds of the movie was kinda thrown out the window at the end, when it all just got preposterous.

So would I recommend this? It’s a serviceable ghost story with a few fresh elements that gets kinda hamstrung by its silly ending, but overall I thought it was pretty decent. I wasn’t bored at any point, the characters were good and kept me interested, and it didn’t annoy me overmuch, though the ending was a bit disappointing. If that sounds like something you can live with, then by all means, give it a whirl.


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Next on the Hulu agenda is a straight-up Blair Witch ripoff called Spirit in the Woods. It has the same premise of college students wandering off into the legend-rich forest and disappearing, with their video cameras turning up later and the contents presented as real found footage. In fact, it looks like it mirrored some shots from Blair Witch pretty much exactly. Now, this movie came out in 2014, and the whole found footage trend was way played out far before that. That’s not to say that something interesting still couldn’t be done with the concept, but this amateurish effort sure ain’t it. In fact, I had a really hard time just sitting through it; it was just painfully, cringingly bad. There is no way that anyone would ever believe that this was actual found footage, since the “actors” were so wincingly terrible that no one would ever mistake them for real people. And it wasn’t even bad enough to be entertaining in a Birdemic sorta way; it was just plodding and boring and lame and irritating as a hemorrhoidal itch. Nothing much happened for easily the first half of the movie; it was just poorly-acted “college students” deciding they were gonna go do their nebulous biology project (?) in the reputedly haunted “Spiritual Woods” (groan), and then there was seemingly endless footage of them getting ready to go out there, interspersed with stupid “news” footage with an anchorman who kept worrying about his hair and doesn’t know how to count down to live TV (note: It’s 3…2…silence, not 1…2…3). Also, did I notice some spelling mistakes on the purportedly real “Missing” posters? Jeez. Director Anthony Daniel raised the money for this on Kickstarter, and I hate to say it, but his backers got ripped off just as surely as The Blair Witch Project did. Honestly, if you’re lucky enough to raise some money from folks to make your movie, at least come up with something original and not something that actively insults your viewers. Spare yourself the hour and twenty minutes of agony and skip it. Blech.

Until next time, keep it creepy, my friends. Goddess out.